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Posts Tagged: nutrition

Nutritious beans stretch food budget

Families today are starved for time, starved for money and starved for well-balanced meals, and USDA projections hold another piece of bad news: food prices are likely to increase 2.5 to 3.5 percent this year.

The good news is there is one powerful five-letter word that will save you money on your food budget, allow you to eat healthier and cook less: beans.

Beans and legumes are a powerhouse of nutrition, heart healthy and very economical. There are endless varieties of beans and legumes and just as many ways to cook them. They can be served as a main dish, a salad and as a dessert. (See below recipes.)

Besides being a great source of protein, beans are naturally low in fat, high in fiber, and rich in vitamins and minerals.

Most beans contain only 2 percent to 3 percent fat and no cholesterol. They even help lower your cholesterol because they are so rich in fiber. Most beans contain 20 percent protein and are high in complex carbohydrates. In addition, they are rich in B vitamins and iron.

To save money at the grocery store, try eating beans and legumes once or twice a week. Cook your own beans instead of using canned and save even more. If you cook up a big batch, freeze some for use in future recipes. Delicious bean recipes can contain as little as four ingredients.

3 can chili

  • 1 14 1/2 oz can of whole kernel corn
  • 1 14 1/2 oz can of diced tomatoes (can use Mexican-style tomatoes with chilies added)
  • 1 14 1/2 oz can of beans or 2 cups of cooked beans (pinto, kidney or your choice)
  • Chili powder to taste

Add all ingredients and heat and serve. For added flavor you can add chopped onions and peppers.

Eggs Mexicali

  • 6-8 eggs
  • 2 cups of salsa, store-bought or homemade
  • 1 15 oz. can of beans (pinto, kidney, black, etc.) or 2 cups of cooked beans
  • 1/4 cup of shredded cheese

Heat salsa and beans in a pan over medium heat until it comes to a boil. Crack an egg in a bowl and add one at a time. Cover and cook until eggs are firm -- about 6 minutes.

Uncover and sprinkle with cheese. Cover until the cheese melts. Serve with rice and tortillas.

Lentils cooked with smoked turkey leg

  • 1 pound of lentils rinsed and sorted
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2-3 cloves of crushed garlic
  • 2 cups each chopped celery and onions
  • 2 cups of sliced or chopped carrots
  • 1 large smoked turkey leg

Add to a pot, cover with water and cook until lentils are done. Remove the cooked turkey leg from the pot and remove the meat. Chop the meat in bite size pieces and add back to the pot. Season to taste with salt and pepper before serving. This recipe can be cooked in a crock pot.

Bean fudge
  • 2/3 cup canned milk
  • 1 1/2 cups miniature marshmallows
  • 1 1/2 cups strained pinto beans
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 2/3 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup nuts
  • 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips
Combine sugar and milk in kettle then boil 5 minutes stirring constantly. Add remaining ingredients and stir until marshmallows melt then pour into buttered pan. Cool and cut into squares.

 


By Margaret Johns
Nutrition, family and consumer sciences advisor, Kern County

Beans are an inexpensive form of protein.
Beans are an inexpensive form of protein.

Posted on Tuesday, January 26, 2010 at 9:23 AM
Tags: beans (3), legumes (1), nutrition (123)

California kids need more fruit and veggies

A report released by the Centers for Disease Control in September 2009 confirms what most moms already know - high school students don't eat anywhere close to enough fruit and vegetables. According to the report, only a third get two servings of fruit a day, and only 13 percent say they get three servings of vegetables.

Adults don't have much higher marks. The CDC said only 33 percent of adults get two servings of fruit, and 27 percent three servings of vegetables.

Compare that to the recommendation in the federal dietary guidelines presented on the My Pyramid Web site. The guidelines say, for ideal health, Americans should be eating 9 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables every day.

Many UC Cooperative Extension offices offer the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program and the Food Stamp Nutrition Education Program, which teach low-income families ways they can add fruit and vegetable servings to their diets.

Here's a popular recipe shared by the UC program which takes only 15 minutes of prep and 20 minutes to cook. It makes use of a variety of winter vegetables available fresh in supermarkets this time of year.

Italian Winter Vegetables

Ingredients
2 cups water
1 cup broccoli florets
1 cup cauliflower florets
2 small zucchini, sliced
1 small onion, diced
3 stalks celery, chopped
1 (8-ounce) can tomato sauce
2 teaspoons basil
1 teaspoon salt (optional)
1 pound package any shape pasta, cooked
Directions
1. Put 1 cup of hot water in a saucepan.
2. Add vegetables and cook for 5 minutes.
3. Add tomato sauce, remaining cup of water, basil and salt.
4. Simmer until heated thoroughly.
5. Serve with cooked pasta.
6. Refrigerate leftovers.

Supermarket produce.
Supermarket produce.

Posted on Friday, December 4, 2009 at 11:39 AM
Tags: food stamp (1), fruit (29), nutrition (123), vegetables (39)

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