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Posts Tagged: exercise

Help children avoid the summer slump

School diet and exercise policies may not be ideal, but research shows that they provide a healthier environment than many children have during summer vacation.

The American Journal of Public Health reported in 2007 that weight gain spiked during the summer between kindergarten and first grade. The difference was especially large for black children, Hispanic children and children who were already overweight at the beginning of kindergarten.

"Instead of scheduled meals and snacks, children at home during summer break may have continuous access to unhealthy snacks,” said Carly Marino, the coordinator of the UC Cooperative Extension Children's Power Play! Campaign in Los Angeles County. “In place of recess, children may spend more time watching television and playing video games. It all adds up to more calories consumed and fewer burned."

Marino is working with the Boys & Girls Club of East Los Angeles to prevent local low-income children’s summer slump. They hosted a week-long program that included lessons on how much sugar is in soft drinks and how many fruits and vegetables to eat. The children participated in a fitness obstacle course and water games in the Boys & Girls Club swimming pool.

As a general rule, elementary school children should get 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day, which can be done throughout the day for at least 10 minutes at a time. They should eat two-and-a-half to five cups of fruits and vegetables every day.

"Parents can help their kids stay on track this summer by including more fruits and vegetables in meals and snacks, limiting screen time and being positive role models," Marino said. "One of the best ways for parents
to help kids get active and maintain healthy eating habits is by enrolling them into a summer activity program, which provides scheduled play and snacks, as well as a safe place for children to learn and grow while parents
work."

The program in Los Angeles was part of the California state Champions for Change campaign. Champions for Change suggests families adopt three simple rules:

  1. Eat more fruits and vegetables.
  2. Be more active.
  3. Speak up for healthy changes.

Children should get 60 minutes a day of exercise.
Children should get 60 minutes a day of exercise.

Posted on Wednesday, June 30, 2010 at 7:04 AM
Tags: exercise (2), nutrition (123), summer (2)

Eating right before, during and after a workout

It is "absolutely essential" to eat and drink two to four hours before workouts to fuel and hydrate the body, says UC Davis sports nutrition expert Liz Applegate. Eating before exercise is particularly important when taking part in activities that require hand-eye coordination, like basketball and fencing.

Applegate recorded a 13-minute video for the UC Cooperative Extension website Feeling Fine Online that outlines what and when athletes should eat for optimum health and performance.

The pre-workout meal, she advises, should be high in carbohydrates, low in fat and contain a moderate amount of protein. Applegate's examples:

  • 1 pita pocket with 3 tablespoons of fruit spread
  • 1 cup of oatmeal with 4 oz. of soy or lowfat milk
  • 6 oz. of vegetable juice with 1/2 cup apricots
  • High carbohydrate energy bar with no more than 10 grams of protein
During workouts, she advises athletes drink 1/2 to 3/4 cup fluid each 15 to 20 minutes. If the workout will last longer than an hour, consume about 100 calories each half hour. Foods to consume during workout sessions could include banana, apple, half a sandwich, sports drinks or energy gels.

"After exercise is where I see lots of mistakes," Applegate says.

She recommends athletes eat a specific amount of carbohydrates within the first 30 minutes post exercise. (To calculate the amount of post-exercise carbs for you, multiply your weight in pounds by 0.7. That gives the number of carbs in grams.) A small amount of protein and antioxidants will also boost recovery. Applegate's post-exercise examples are:

  • Smoothie with fruit and yogurt, protein powder or soy milk
  • Bean burrito with 6 oz. of fruit juice
  • Tuna sandwich with 8 oz. of cranberry juice
  • 2 mozzarella sticks, a whole grain English muffin and an orange

Recovery also requires rehydration. Applegate recommends drinking 16 oz. of fluid for each pound of sweat lost.

An apple after exercise aids recovery.
An apple after exercise aids recovery.

Posted on Friday, May 21, 2010 at 7:37 AM
Tags: exercise (2), Liz Applegate (2), sports (1)
 
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